Video

Bionic Yarn transforms fibers made from recycled plastic into high performance fabrics for all walks of life.

Musician, entrepreneur and creative director of Bionic Yarn, Pharrell Williams speaks with CEO Tyson Toussant and shares an inside look at the production process from plastic bottle to new product.

www.bionicyarn.com
@bionicyarn

(Source: youtube.com, via atelierethical)

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Screen printing…

rachellumley:

Teaching and work shops at Signature Prints.

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Showing sustainability is nothing new…

putthison:

Boro: The Beauty of Thrift

I’ve become really interested in other forms of textiles lately. Lots of stuff such as Middle Eastern rugs, Navajo weavings, American quilts, and Japanese boro. Boro comes out of Japan’s countrysides, where cloth used to be very precious and valuable. Since disposing things wasn’t an option, the wives of farmers and fishermen would patch and mend bags, blankets, futon covers, clothes, and even diapers. As a result, you get these beautiful objects with hundreds of shades of indigo, often pieced together with a type of rough running stitch known as sashiko

Boro used to be a source of embarrassment for many families, because of its association with poverty, but in more recent times, they’ve become collectors items. If you’re in NYC, you can check some out at Shibui (at least until they move locations in a few weeks) as well as Sri Threads. The second is an appointment-only gallery run by Stephen Szczepanek. You can read an article about him at the New York Times, and check out his wonderful blog, where he posts about the things he’s found in Japan. It’s hard for me to pick a favorite entry, but this one would be a contender. Notice that the stitching forms an interesting geometric pattern across the whole garment. As Stephen writes, those shapes represent masu — a type of wooden box used to measure rice during Japan’s feudal period. 

The price of boro can really range. Sometimes you can find them on eBay for $150-300, but the designs tend to be somewhat simple. Nicer pieces can be found at galleries and speciality auction houses, but in the thousands of dollars. I’m hoping to find a nice, but affordable, piece in the next year, and use it to line the inside of a black leather moto jacket. Fingers crossed. 

(Photos via Sri Threads’ blog)

Video

Hand Block Printing Using Wooden Blocks - A Tutorial by DesiCrafts 

(Source: fuckyeahcraft)

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Unbelievably well-preserved precolumbian textiles from Peru.

karduniash:

Unbelievably well-preserved precolumbian textiles from Peru.

1-2. Naza-Wari fusion epoch (800-1300 A.D.), woven feathers. 3-6 Moche-Wari fusion epoch (800-1300 A.D.), 7-8. Chincha (1300-1532 A.D.), these are the finest threaded textiles in the entire world, 398 threads per linear inch. 9-11. Paracas (800-100 B.C.) funerary mantles and shirt.

From the Museo Larco in Lima, Peru

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Gigantic gauge knit…
iamgiganticknits:

Major texture on this chunky knit vest. #iamgiganticknit

Gigantic gauge knit…

iamgiganticknits:

Major texture on this chunky knit vest. #iamgiganticknit

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Hand woven…

Hand woven…

(Source: prudstyle)

Link

(Source: historybuffstar)

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Some hand embroidery on a quilt…

Some hand embroidery on a quilt…

(via weftwarp)

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Repeat prints…

eastlondonprintmakers:

We learnt how to print repeats on fabric yesterday with Helen Ashton patlunch

Helen will be running a course focussing on the ins and outs of repeat printing. Starts tomorrow and there are a couple of places left - book here!