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prismaticearth:

Here are the works that were featured at the Prismatic Earth Gallery during our pop-shop last April 27th. All works utilize the medium of natural dyes in different ways. 

List of Artists:

Rachel Rushing 

Analise Minjarez

Morgan Kuster

June Covington

Sarah Westrup

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vilte:

materials: handspun silk, raw silk, silk chiffon
natural dyes: black walnut, alkanet
photo credit: Svetlana Batura

vilte:

materials: handspun silk, raw silk, silk chiffon

natural dyes: black walnut, alkanet

photo credit: Svetlana Batura

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stephanie-jansen:

Swatches from Natural Dyeing 101 at the Textile Arts Center

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saritasunbeam:

Painting with Natural Dyes Workshop with Sarah Westrup
JUN 7 12:30pm-4:30pm

If you are in the Dallas area, consider taking this workshop at Oil and Cotton!

This is a great chance to learn about the magical process of dyeing with cochineal bugs to obtain the precious color red.

In this class students will learn how to paint patterns on their cloth using invisible mordants and then dip their cloth in a steaming dye pot of cochineal to make your beautiful designs appear.The process is all about the surprise and can be used on paper! This class is geared towards beginners who are looking to dive into the world of natural color!

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fibersnorthtexas:

Weld

Historically weld has given the world the most lightfast and washfast yellows. We believed this historically prevalent plant would be a great addition to our experimental natural dye garden at the University of North Texas. Yesterday, the dye garden volunteers were able to finally harvest our weld to create a beautiful dye bath. 

First we cut off only the good looking leaves and flowers of the weld plant. We didn’t want any thing that looked burned from our hot Texas sun or that looked immature. Next, we cut up our flowers into small pieces to make it easier for the color to be extracted from the plant. We let the plants soak over night and then placed them in a pot of water and let the pot get to a boil.

You want to use 50% of dried weld to WOF (weight of fiber) and let the plant boil until the the weld flowers and leaves sink to the bottom of the pot(~15min.). Next, you strain the plant material from the dye stock, add a little chalk to the dye bath (if you have some), and place your fiber in the dye pot (at a simmer) until you reach the desired shade (30-40min). 

We played around with painted mordants and achieved beautiful dark shades of green by using a iron mordant paint and bright shades of yellow by using an alum acetate mordant paint. You can achieve so many shades from one dye pot by mixing your mordants and thickening them!

More Natural Dye Garden adventures will be posted soon!  

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fibersnorthtexas:

Indian Blanket Flowers

Today we looked outside of our University of North Texas Natural Dye Garden for some color inspiration. After seeing what beautiful pink shades Folk Fibers (from Austin TX) was able to obtain from the wild indian blanket, a few of us wanted to experience the color too! 

We got a lead on where to find bountiful amounts of indian blankets and then when out there to harvest. We were stunned by the beauty of these fiery orange flowers encompassing the north texas prairie.

We picked about 500 grams of flowers and went back to the dye studio to make magic happen. We were very interested in experimenting with this plant, so we split our harvest in half. One half we used on a hot pot and the other half will be used in a solar dye bath. We expect there will be some color variation between the two pots, but we will have to wait a week and see.

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turquoisebirds:

Wool yarn I dyed recently—with dandelion blossoms (left), scarlet globemallow (center), and yellow onion skins (right). 

turquoisebirds:

Wool yarn I dyed recently—with dandelion blossoms (left), scarlet globemallow (center), and yellow onion skins (right). 

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gretapepper:

Wool dyeing:

So one of the main reasons I went to Sweden was to work on this weaving project with my friend Eyja.  She and her husband had already started to build the warp weighted loom before I arrived and were kind enough to have me stay with them for nearly a month while we worked on this project.  Anyway, in the first week that I was there we decided to dye some yarn before weaving with it.  Eyja had ordered madder, walnut, and woad online and we also gathered birch leaves from the forest near her house.  I think my favourite part was rinsing the yarn in the stream in their yard, and drying it on the bridge : )

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yeti-crafts:

30 Days of Creativity - Day 7
Shibori is a Japanese folding and dyeing process using indigo dye. It’s a lot of fun, but it’s super messy!

yeti-crafts:

30 Days of Creativity - Day 7

Shibori is a Japanese folding and dyeing process using indigo dye. It’s a lot of fun, but it’s super messy!

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fairyimp:

better pics of final piece… hanging them up tomorrow eee